On Reading and Having Read: the Downsides of ASOIAF

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Greetings all, Prudence here! I hope you’re enjoying this soggy (in the UK, anyway – I hear the Swedes are having magnificent weather?!) end to May, and have your booknoses in something interesting. I’ve just finished reading A Song of Ice and Fire for the second time, because I was getting annoyed with having not-quite-finished it before, and having read it so quickly the first time that I’d forgotten most things about who was who and where and why. So, at the beginning of the year, I started again.

The thing is, those are some hefty books. Great books (mostly – I have some real issues with the structure of A Feast for Crows, but that is not for this post! And also I do have the fifth book in the set pictured above, but I was halfway through reading it at the time of photographing) but still, they’re enormous (no seriously, those editions specifically are gorgeous but VAST. We had to take them back on the train and it was much more muscular work than being a booklover generally consists of!). I am a fond and avid reader of many things, and I always have a string of books on the go, and it’s true that in the time I’ve reread ASOIAF I have also read books on robots, food, tidying and boarding schools, but still, I’ve felt very nagged by not just being in the middle of that series, but really wanting to finish it. I do like reading, but sometimes, I wonder if I like Having Read more.

Perhaps it depends on the book. There are some books, like “Buzz Aldrin, Whatever Happened to You in All the Confusion”; that I love so very much, I never want the experience of reading them to end, because the trickle of wonderfully well-placed words is the greatest delight imaginable. The very experience of consuming the words is as pleasurable and fascinating as the story within them. There are some writers – Margaret Atwood is sometimes a good example of this for me – where the experience of reading the words is one I actually find preferable to consuming the story. It’s certainly true that there are gloriously-crafted phrases, paragraphs, scenes and, occasionally, whole chapters of ASOIAF, but as a whole, the experience of reading it has been largely one of putting together a mosaic and not being able to see the whole picture.

The Very Long Book can really frustrate me when I want to look back on it (and, of course, ASOIAF is so much worse in that sense being as it is also the Unfinished Series of Very Long Books) but I have yet to finish it. I’m not always the most disciplined reader, either. I’m fickle and changeable. If I’m really loving the words in a novel, I’ll treat it like an excellent meal, or a delicious drink, consuming it incredibly slowly, or, worst of all, even failing to pick the book up at all because I want to know there’s more of it there to enjoy. You can tell how much I’m enjoying a book by whether or not I’m actually glued to it, or if I start putting it down and trying to get on with things like housework, or checking my phone. It’s awful – the more I love something, the more I’ll try to avoid it. Yet if it’s the plot I want out of a book, and the writing isn’t doing much for me, I’ll belt through it, desperate to tie up loose ends, to get the full picture, to find out whodunnit and why.

In a sense, ASOIAF is the worst kind of series for me – I love the plot, and dearly wanted to know where it was going, but I was also actively enjoying the reading of it, and trying to pay proper proper attention to everything and everyone so I can talk authoritatively about it with anyone and everyone who wants to discuss it (which does appear to include absolutely everyone I know). I didn’t want it to be over, but I also really wanted to have read it. I didn’t want to read it to the exclusion of everything else, because that’s not really how I read anything, but it was also going on for a Very Long Time. It’s been difficult! Hear my cries!

But it has also been great. And surely, surely, I don’t have to wait that much longer for The Winds of Winter? (sidenote: The Crow and I met GRRM nearly two years ago at a Thing in Bath and he read us a Tyrion chapter that isn’t either of the released ones so far, so that was exciting).

I should be celebrating having finished these extensive reads by reading something short and punchy and exciting, but since I’ve been talking a lot about ‘Buzz Aldrin, Whatever Happened…?’ I’ve been thinking I’d really like to revisit that. Perhaps, as it is now finally available on Kindle, we’ll make it our June Book Club read. This June we are dearly intending to get our GoodReads and our Book Club shifting up a gear! You can find us here on the site – do add us, and look out for more! And why not treat yourself to a copy of this most beautifully unusual book? It’s one of the very few I feel I could comfortably recommend to just about anyone.

We’ve been very good and getting ahead of ourselves this month – we’ve allocated some most exciting books for our current subscribers! And if you ever feel like updating your preferences with us, do remember that you can revisit your questionnaire and add info to it any time you like, or simply drop us a line through our contact page on our site.

Finally! Here’s a lovely little review of one of our May boxes, for which we’re most grateful 🙂 at Left Right Lost.

Happy May to you all!

 

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